Viewing entries tagged
Steam

Built to Play Awards 2015: The Curse Continues

Comment

Built to Play Awards 2015: The Curse Continues

The ghost of Hiroshi Yamauchi traps us again, and we have to recount the objective best games we may or may not have played

The Group Prizes

Best Game We Didn’t Play

  • Life is Strange
  • Destiny: The Taken King
  • Rise of the Tomb Raider
  • Xenoblade Chronicles X
  • Assassin’s Creed Syndicate
  • Fallout 4

Best Sunglasses

  • Metal Gear Solid V
  • Undertale
tumblr_inline_nwe9i91QzF1txd5ul_540.jpg
  • Boxboy
  • Tales from the Borderlands
Shade_Zero_Sum.PNG
  • NuckleDu
maxresdefault.jpg

Worst Game We Didn’t Play

  • Mario Party 10
  • Afro Samurai 2: Revenge of Kuma
  • Tony Hawk 5
  • Hatred
  • The Order: 1886

Best Moment While Playing a Game

  • That moment you find out Adam set himself on fire in EWTTR
  • When you realize the ways Undertale tracks your play-style
  • That moment you realize MGSV’s world is contiguous
  • That moment when you realize Mario Maker isn’t a Mario game

Worst Cloud Strife

5.jpg

Individual Prizes

Best Tumblr: Undertale

Best Detective: Me in Her Story

Highest Box Count: Box Boy

Best Iconic Hat: Hearthstone

Most Disappointing Numbers: Time Clickers

Best Dating Sim: Mario Maker (Kind of)

Most Story: Witcher 3

Worst Bells: Bloodborne

Surprise Award: ??????????


BUILT TO PLAY IS A PRODUCT OF CJRU IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN TORONTO. IT WAS PRODUCED BY ARMAN AGHBALI AND DANIEL ROSEN.

Music from Undertale, The Witcher 3, and Super Mario Maker. "Pixelland," "Bit Quest," and "Mighty Like Us" by Kevin MacLeod.

IF YOU LIKE THE SHOW PLEASE SUBSCRIBE AND RATE US ONLINE. IT HELPS MORE PEOPLE FIND THE SHOW AND GIVES US AN IDEA HOW WE'RE DOING. FEEL FREE TO COMMENT DOWN BELOW.

Comment

Built to Play 47: Poor Assumptions

Comment

Built to Play 47: Poor Assumptions

IT'S AN EPISODE IN WHICH WE FINALLY STOP TALKING ABOUT VIRTUAL REALITY AND MOVE ON TO WEEKS OF PLAYING WITH PALS. WE START WITH THE END  OF GAMERCAMP.

Movie buffs visit film festivals. Bibliophiles browse books fairs. But game players charge into the convention. It's a practice hailing back from the olden times of the Star Trek conventions, to tech meetups in the early Silicon Valley and the mighty heights of the San Diego Comic Con. For the avid fan, there's multiple Penny Arcade Expos in the United States, Gamescom in Germany, and the Tokyo Game Show in Japan. These days there's so many that if you take a look in your own backyard, you'll probably find one.

Big game conventions can feel exhausting though. You're fighting tens of thousands of people in a hall. Massive companies push their way towards you to showcase their newest games. And what if you're looking for local products, games made in your hometown, maybe an experiment or two? Every hub for game design has at least one little event for enthusiasts, like a party a few friends put together for their community. In Toronto, we had Gamercamp.

Comment

Built to Play 44: Harmonic Stuff

Comment

Built to Play 44: Harmonic Stuff

ON BUILT TO PLAY, WE PUT ON A HEADSET, STRAP ON A PAIR OF HEADPHONES, AND TALK ABOUT VIRTUAL REALITY IN ALL ITS FORMS.

Some people just can't stop thinking about virtual reality. Last week Oculus chief technology officer John Carmack (and the creator of DOOM) got on stage at the VR conference, Oculus Connect, and improvised a speech about the technology for more than an hour. Oculus Connect is also where the Facebook-owned tech firm revealed their newest, and presumably last, Oculus Rift prototype, Crescent Bay. With 3D audio and better motion tracking, it looks like this prototype is the closest we've come to confusing reality with the virtual.

But Arman and Daniel are not these people. They don't have time to keep up with these people and their "headsets." They're far too busy playing the new Smash Bros. So they called up a local VR game developer,Stephan Tanguay, to explain the ins and outs of modern virtual reality.

Stephan has been a fan of VR since at least mid-'80s. He watched the great outpouring of shoddy, ugly and straight-up misguided VR attempts get laughed out of the room. So when the Oculus Rift came out in 2012 as a developer's kit, Stephan was one of the first to use it. He's been waiting for a while to see a form of virtual reality that's easy to create games for, is affordable, and can fully immerse you in another world.

Comment

Built to Play 27: Distant Love

Comment

Built to Play 27: Distant Love

This week on Built to Play, Supreme Commander asserts that "the holocaust never happened," thanks to trolls.

Valve added the ability to tag games on Steam based on consensus. Suggest a tag often enough and people agree, it becomes an official tag on the game. This tactic has led to tags like one attached to Supreme Commander, along with "Jews did 9/11." Valve's initial response was to claim it was a perception issue. From the Steam FAQ, "Often this is simply because there is some piece of information regarding the game that customers feel is missing from the store page."

Valve has since removed some of the more abusive tags like "not a game" and "hipster garbage" which were attached to Gone Home. But Farming Simulator 2013 remains tagged as a "roguelike."

Download here. Subscribe on iTunes. Subscribe on Stitcher. 

Across the Pacific, Nintendo is trying out free to play games with Steel Diver. And the Zero Escape visual novel series didn't sell enough copies in Japan to make the final game in the trilogy. The game's director Kotoru Uchikoshi says that the first two games, Virtue's Last Reward and 9 Hours 9 Days 9 Doors are in the red domestically and so he won't get a big enough budget for the third game. 

Finally, Flappy Bird went through a whole saga and then disappeared. After becoming the most popular game on iOS app store, critics, including Jason Schreier from Kotaku, lambasted the game for its simple design and addictive sensibilities. The creator, Dong Nguyen, who lives in Hanoi, Vietnam, was then attacked by people over twitter about the game's difficulty and by designers who felt that the $50,000 he was making a day through advertising was undeserved. Nguyen then removed the game from the app store for the sake of its players mental health, which is either a sick burn or genuine concern. The word is still out. 

Our interviews this week are all about love, the human heart and relationships.

Matt Hammill of Asteroid Base joins us to talk about Lovers in a Dangerous Spacetime. The game is a two-player co-op game about flying through space, fighting aliens, and giving each other intense "love dances." The game's title began as just an in-joke between the team, but soon grew to inform the game's design and some of their perception of outer space. In the game, space is a neon-bright version of the abyss filled with so much colour that the Powerpuff Girls would blush. It's also led to some interesting testing sessions, as the game seems to attract actual couples. You can find out more starting 26:18.

Then Kara Stone talks about her art project, Hand to Heart, which uses your hand as a controller, and your heart as a gameplay mechanic. Through a variety of different controllers based around the human hand, the player tracks their own heart rate. Stone's found that it inadvertently causes all four players heart rate to sync up, even in the chaos of say, the Long Winter concert in Toronto. You can hear her talk about it starting 37:20.

By the end, Jake Reardon and Justin Amirkhani discuss Always Sometimes Monsters, their cross-country adventure game. You have a week to make it from the east coast to the west coast to find a lost love. The game is mostly based on Amirkhani's experiences hitchhiking across North America, back in 2012. Amirkhani met Sam Rossi Harries who fell in love with a cyclist named Maya. Together they treked across the west coast of the US to meet her again in a random beach in Oregan. But that's not the only experience Amirkhani's drawing from, and Reardon has his own life to share. Starts at 42:50

Amirkhani photographs himself at a motel while Sam Rossi Harries and Maya talk in the background. Courtesy Justin Amirkhani

Amirkhani photographs himself at a motel while Sam Rossi Harries and Maya talk in the background. Courtesy Justin Amirkhani


This week had music from the Free Music Archive. That's Twin Sister - I Want a House, Supercute - Candy City, Pietnastka - School Boy, Johnny-Ripper - Your Heart with George, Chuzausen - Raro Bueno. There's also Gareusch's sound from Freesound.

Comment

Built to Play 19: Mexican Controllers

Comment

Built to Play 19: Mexican Controllers

SteamController.jpg

On this Tuesday edition of Built to Play we won't stop Mexican wrestling. We put Valve's final announcement last week, the brand new Steam Controller, under a chokehold of criticism. Then we body slammed our way through the new Nintendo Direct, giving special mention to the open world of Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds. Meanwhile news of Sega Sammy's recent layoffs come like a knee to the groin. We tore off the mask of some Kickstarter news, with guest Matt Gilgenbach handing us a chair for more details on the end of his campaign for Neverending Nightmares. China then broke into the ring and declared an end to its game console ban, at least within the new Shanghai Free Trade Zone, meant to attract foreigners to one of China's largest cities.

Once again we have more comical news in our bonus round, including the Deus Ex Universe and the new Sonic TV show. 

Plus we have a tag team match with Graham Smith and Chris McQuinn, two of the leaders from Drinkbox Studios in Toronto. They gave us a post-mortem on the Luchalibre-themed game, Guacamelee, making all of these bad puns completely justified.  

Music used in this weeks episode comes from the Free Music Archive, featuring Johnny_Ripper - Carousel, and the Guacamelee soundtrack, which you can check out below. 

Comment

Built to Play 18: Tonight's the Night for Ransom

Comment

Built to Play 18: Tonight's the Night for Ransom

steam_os.jpg

This week we Valve's online storefront, Steam, rapidly expands. Beginning with the Steam OS, the Steam Box, and the Steam Controller, it looks like Valve will be running into a console crunching future. Then there's the best looking game for the PS4, Deep Down, which is apparently free but filled with microtransactions. This is coming out of a company with only $150 million in the bank. And This Week in Xbox One News (TWIX-ON),  Microsoft continues to have bad PR, as their public relations specialists make sure everyone knew that the Xbox One isn't as capable as the Xbox 30 at launch. Lucasfilm is dreaming up an amazing future where movies will be made in real time with video game rendering technology.

This week marks the return of the bonus round, where we run through Jaffe Ghost Hunting & Co, Clang gets blunted and the Persona Countdown.

Plus an interview with three of the designers behind the River City Ransom Underground Kickstarterand how easy it is to get a 20-year-old game license. Behind the effort is Ottawa, Canada based studio, Conatus Creative. 

This week's episode uses the following songs: Are you Ready? - Patti LaBelle and Boss Theme 2 - River City Ransom OST. 

Unfortunately not featured in this episode, Tonight Tonight Tonight  - Beat Crusaders.

Comment